This blog is about Graphic Design, Vector Art, and Cartoon Illustration BradHallArt.com


Are you a creative person?

It can be pretty tricky to determine if you are a creative person. You can find out, but it's a journey of discovery. Sad to say, people around you can't really tell you. Your friends and family will mostly tell you what you want to hear. But if you would like to begin on the road of a career of being a creative person, it would be nice to know if you really have the aptitude.

Back in the dark ages, when I was going to college, teachers could tell you outright. By the time I became a teacher, it had become a serious no-no. And it wasn't just because my generation of teachers were nicer, it had to do with schools getting sued. It has made for a kinder, gentler world of higher education, but, well, it would be nice if someone could tell you that you're wasting your time. Sorry, they can't. As a college teacher I was informed that not only could the school get sued, but I could be personally liable, too. So, I just smiled and encouraged.

But you can find out for yourself if you are a creative person. And there are some distinct traits that all creative people have. If you find them in yourself, you are in luck, a career as a creative person is for you. If not, well, don't feel bad, most good jobs out there don't require creativity. Here are the traits of creative people -

• Creative people create. OK, I know that sounds like nonsense, but flip it over. Non-creative people destroy. Now don't get me wrong, creative people blow things up, as in pyrotechnics, but they do it as a work of art. Go watch fireworks to see what I mean. So, if you are the kind of person who does nothing but criticize and tear down, then find a career that fits your personality. Leave the creative people alone.

• Creative people have projects. It doesn't have to be drawing or painting, just projects. And creative people always have a lot of them going. No, they don't always finish them. They learn by doing, not by watching. They want to be involved. If people like that strike you as someone who "has too much time on their hands", then just leave them alone. There are other career paths open to you.

As a teacher at The Art Institute of Phoenix, I was always overjoyed to find that the vast majority of people who had signed up for the classes showed all of the "symptoms" of being creative people. The small percentage who weren't made me feel a little sad that someone couldn't walk up to them and tap them on the shoulder, but no one could. But they always found out.